The Open Window

by H. H. Munro (Saki) (1870-1916)

"My aunt will be down presently, Mr. Nuttel," said a very self-possessed young lady of fifteen; "in the meantime you must try and put up with me."

Framton Nuttel endeavored to say the correct something which should duly flatter the niece of the moment without unduly discounting the aunt that was to come. Privately he doubted more than ever whether these formal visits on a succession of total strangers would do much towards helping the nerve cure which he was supposed to be undergoing

"I know how it will be," his sister had said when he was preparing to migrate to this rural retreat; "you will bury yourself down there and not speak to a living soul, and your nerves will be worse than ever from moping. I shall just give you letters of introduction to all the people I know there. Some of them, as far as I can remember, were quite nice."

Framton wondered whether Mrs. Sappleton, the lady to whom he was presenting one of the letters of introduction came into the nice division.

"Do you know many of the people round here?" asked the niece, when she judged that they had had sufficient silent communion.

"Hardly a soul," said Framton. "My sister was staying here, at the rectory, you know, some four years ago, and she gave me letters of introduction to some of the people here."

He made the last statement in a tone of distinct regret.

"Then you know practically nothing about my aunt?" pursued the self-possessed young lady.

"Only her name and address," admitted the caller. He was wondering whether Mrs. Sappleton was in the married or widowed state. An undefinable something about the room seemed to suggest masculine habitation.

"Her great tragedy happened just three years ago," said the child; "that would be since your sister's time."

"Her tragedy?" asked Framton; somehow in this restful country spot tragedies seemed out of place.

"You may wonder why we keep that window wide open on an October afternoon," said the niece, indicating a large French window that opened on to a lawn.

"It is quite warm for the time of the year," said Framton; "but has that window got anything to do with the tragedy?"

"Out through that window, three years ago to a day, her husband and her two young brothers went off for their day's shooting. They never came back. In crossing the moor to their favorite snipe-shooting ground they were all three engulfed in a treacherous piece of bog. It had been that dreadful wet summer, you know, and places that were safe in other years gave way suddenly without warning. Their bodies were never recovered. That was the dreadful part of it." Here the child's voice lost its self-possessed note and became falteringly human. "Poor aunt always thinks that they will come back someday, they and the little brown spaniel that was lost with them, and walk in at that window just as they used to do. That is why the window is kept open every evening till it is quite dusk. Poor dear aunt, she has often told me how they went out, her husband with his white waterproof coat over his arm, and Ronnie, her youngest brother, singing 'Bertie, why do you bound?' as he always did to tease her, because she said it got on her nerves. Do you know, sometimes on still, quiet evenings like this, I almost get a creepy feeling that they will all walk in through that window--"

She broke off with a little shudder. It was a relief to Framton when the aunt bustled into the room with a whirl of apologies for being late in making her appearance.

"I hope Vera has been amusing you?" she said.

"She has been very interesting," said Framton.

"I hope you don't mind the open window," said Mrs. Sappleton briskly; "my husband and brothers will be home directly from shooting, and they always come in this way. They've been out for snipe in the marshes today, so they'll make a fine mess over my poor carpets. So like you menfolk, isn't it?"

She rattled on cheerfully about the shooting and the scarcity of birds, and the prospects for duck in the winter. To Framton it was all purely horrible. He made a desperate but only partially successful effort to turn the talk on to a less ghastly topic, he was conscious that his hostess was giving him only a fragment of her attention, and her eyes were constantly straying past him to the open window and the lawn beyond. It was certainly an unfortunate coincidence that he should have paid his visit on this tragic anniversary.

"The doctors agree in ordering me complete rest, an absence of mental excitement, and avoidance of anything in the nature of violent physical exercise," announced Framton, who labored under the tolerably widespread delusion that total strangers and chance acquaintances are hungry for the least detail of one's ailments and infirmities, their cause and cure. "On the matter of diet they are not so much in agreement," he continued.

"No?" said Mrs. Sappleton, in a voice which only replaced a yawn at the last moment. Then she suddenly brightened into alert attention--but not to what Framton was saying.

"Here they are at last!" she cried. "Just in time for tea, and don't they look as if they were muddy up to the eyes!"

Framton shivered slightly and turned towards the niece with a look intended to convey sympathetic comprehension. The child was staring out through the open window with a dazed horror in her eyes. In a chill shock of nameless fear Framton swung round in his seat and looked in the same direction.

In the deepening twilight three figures were walking across the lawn towards the window, they all carried guns under their arms, and one of them was additionally burdened with a white coat hung over his shoulders. A tired brown spaniel kept close at their heels. Noiselessly they neared the house, and then a hoarse young voice chanted out of the dusk: "I said, Bertie, why do you bound?"

Framton grabbed wildly at his stick and hat; the hall door, the gravel drive, and the front gate were dimly noted stages in his headlong retreat. A cyclist coming along the road had to run into the hedge to avoid imminent collision.

"Here we are, my dear," said the bearer of the white mackintosh, coming in through the window, "fairly muddy, but most of it's dry. Who was that who bolted out as we came up?"

"A most extraordinary man, a Mr. Nuttel," said Mrs. Sappleton; "could only talk about his illnesses, and dashed off without a word of goodby or apology when you arrived. One would think he had seen a ghost."

"I expect it was the spaniel," said the niece calmly; "he told me he had a horror of dogs. He was once hunted into a cemetery somewhere on the banks of the Ganges by a pack of pariah dogs, and had to spend the night in a newly dug grave with the creatures snarling and grinning and foaming just above him. Enough to make anyone lose their nerve."

Romance at short notice was her speciality.

The Open Window Summary | Detailed Summary

Framton Nuttel has been sent to a small country town in England to recover from some type of nervous condition. Framton's doctors have told him to avoid any "mental excitement" or "violent physical exercise." He is to take a "complete rest." Framton's sister has provided Framton with letters of introduction to people she met when she had visited the same town, four years before. The sister provided the letters to counter what she knows is Framton's tendency to hide from everyone and mope. Framton is leery of meeting strangers, but has decided to venture out on a formal visit to Mrs. Sappleton, hoping that she would be one of the people his sister had remembered as being "quite nice."

When he arrives at Mrs. Sappleton's house, he finds that she is not immediately available, so he is received by her 15-year-old niece, Vera. Vera is a very confident young lady, and rather than putting Framton at ease, her manner flusters and disconcerts him, magnifying his natural tendency toward social awkwardness.

Making small talk, Vera asks him if he knows many people in the area. Framton replies that he knows no one and explains about his sister and the letters of introduction. When Vera discovers that he knows almost nothing about Mrs. Sappleton, she proceeds to tell him the tale, of what she calls, her aunt's "great tragedy."

Vera calls Framton's attention to the large, French window in the room, which is open despite the fact that it is October. Framton comments that the afternoon is quite warm for autumn, and then asks if the window has something to do with her aunt's tragedy. Vera relates that it was exactly three years ago that her aunt's husband and two brothers went hunting for snipe. They left through that very window, but they never returned, having been swallowed up by a wetter than usual section of the bog. Their little dog was lost with them. While she tells the tale, Vera becomes less self-possessed, and her voice takes on a faltering quality. She confides to Framton that her aunt believes that the men will return one day, that they and their spaniel will simply walk across the lawn and enter the house the way they left, through the open window. Vera explains that this is why the window is kept open every evening until dark; her aunt expects her husband to return, carrying his coat, and accompanied by her brothers, one of whom will be singing his customary tune when they return from the day's shooting. Vera confides, with a shudder, that she gets a "creepy feeling" on evenings such as this. When it is quiet and still, even she half expects the men to return.

Just when she finishes her story, Mrs. Sappleton enters the room, apologizing to Framton for being late in her arrival and hoping Vera has kept him good company. Mrs. Sappleton says she hopes the open window does not bother Framton. Mrs. Sappleton cheerfully explains to him that her husband and brothers have gone snipe-shooting and always come back through that window, tracking mud all over her carpets. Mrs. Sappleton then continues talking about hunting, and how the birds are scarce, and wondering whether there will be duck in the coming winter. Framton finds her comments and the discussion about hunting "horrible" after what Vera has told him. Framton also finds it disconcerting that Mrs. Sappleton's eyes continually look past him to the open window and the lawn outside, giving him only a small part of her attention when he attempts to change the subject. Framton thinks it is unfortunate he has come to visit on the very anniversary of the men's disappearance.

While trying to change the subject, Framton blurts out to Mrs. Sappleton, under the mistaken impression she will be interested in the specifics of his ailments, that his doctors ordered him to take a complete rest, to avoid any type of mental stress, or any excessive physical exercise. Framton finishes by noting his doctors were not in agreement about what type of diet would be best for him. Mrs. Sappleton finds his conversation boring. Mrs. Sappleton suppresses a yawn, but then she suddenly becomes alert and announces that the men have arrived, at last, and just in time for tea.

Framton shivers and looks to the niece, Vera, hoping that he conveys the appropriate note of sympathy for her aunt's obvious delusion. Instead, he sees that Vera is staring through the open window with a look of horror on her face. Framton turns to follow her gaze and sees, coming across the lawn in the darkening light, three figures, one who has a coat hanging over his shoulders, accompanied by a tired spaniel that is struggling to keep up with them. Framton hears a man singing while the figures approach the house.

Framton grabs for his hat and walking stick and races out of the house without saying goodbye. Framton runs down the drive and through the front gate, without a memory of passing any of these things, and nearly collides with a bicyclist when he enters the roadway.

Back at the house, Mr. Sappleton, carrying his coat over his arm when he enters the room through the open window, announces the men's arrival to his wife and niece. Mr. Sappleton asks her about the man who just ran out of the room when they approached.

Mrs. Sappleton describes Framton Nuttel to her husband as a boring visitor who could only talk about his illnesses and who rushed off without even saying goodbye or apologizing. Mrs. Sappleton remarks it was as though he had seen a ghost.

Vera speculates to the family that it was the appearance of the spaniel that probably sent Mr. Nuttel rushing away. Vera says Mr. Framton had told her he was afraid of dogs. Mr. Framton's fear stemmed from a time he was chased into a cemetery on the banks of the Ganges River by a pack of wild dogs; he was forced to spend the night in a newly dug grave, with the dogs snarling above him. Vera comments that this would be enough to make anyone afraid.


short summary


At the beginning of this story, Frampton Nuttal, a man who is in the countryside as a rest cure for his nerves, is sitting talking to Vera, a 15 year old girl. Vera is a niece of Mrs Sappleton, a woman to whom Frampton has been given a letter of introduction by his sister.

While they are waiting for Mrs Sappleton to come downstairs, Vera tells Frampton that her aunt's husband and two young brothers were drowned in the marshes while out shooting several years ago. The tragedy sent the aunt out of her mind, and she always keeps the French window (glass door
) into the garden open, believing that they will come back.

Mrs Sappleton then arrives, apologising for the open window and explaining that she is expecting her husband and brothers any moment. Frampton plays along with her, until he is horrified by seeing three figures, and a dog, coming out of the dusk towards the house. He runs away in panic; the husband and brothers arrive, very puzzled by the guest's strange behaviour. Vera calmly tells them that it must have been the dog; he told her he was terrified of dogs after being attacked by wild dogs in India.

Vera is very good at making up stories quickly
.


[ Summary of Story: H.H. Munro's (Saki) "The Open Window" brilliantly portrays how one's nerves affects his/her personality. As Framton embarks on a trip intended as a "nerve cure," he finds himself in an unfamiliar situation that ultimately has a negative effect on his seemingly nervous personality. The story allows students and teachers a glimpse at the reality of two characters, and, ultimately, the reader will side with one of the characters in the story. This is a perfect story for a rainy day or during the fall season!]


Themes

Though it is a remarkably short piece of fiction, “The Open Window” explores a number of important themes. Mr. Nuttel comes to the country in an attempt to cure his nervous condition. He pays a visit to the home of Mrs. Sappleton in order to introduce himself, and before he gets to meet the matron of tha house, he is intercepted by her niece, who regales him with an artful piece of fiction that, in the end, only makes his nervous condition worse.

Appearances and Reality

It is no surprise that Mrs. Sappleton’s niece tells a story that is easy to believe. She begins with an object in plain view, an open window, and proceeds from there. The window is obviously open, but for the reasons for its being open the reader is completely at the mercy of Mrs. Sappleton’s niece, at least while she tells her story. The open window becomes a symbol within this story-within-a-story, and its appearance becomes its reality. When Mr. Nuttel (and the reader) are presented with a contrary reality at the end of the story, the result is a tension between appearance and reality that needs to be resolved: Which is real? Can they both be real?

Deception

Were it not for deception, this story could not happen. The action and irony of the story revolve around the apparent deception that Mrs. Sappleton’s niece practices. It remains to be seen, however, whether this deception is a harmless prank or the result of a sinister disposition. If the niece’s deception is cruel, then the reader must question the motives behind the deception practiced by all tellers of stories, including Saki himself.

Sanity and Insanity

“The Open Window” shows just how fine the line can be between sanity and insanity. Mr. Nuttel’s susceptibility to deceit is no different from that of the reader of the story. Yet Mr. Nuttel is insane, and the reader, presumably, is not. In order to maintain this distinction, Saki forces his reader to consider the nature of insanity and its causes.


Characters

Framton Nuttel’s Sister

Framton Nuttel’s sister once spent time in the same town to which Framton has come for relaxation. She has given him a number of letters of introduction with which he is to make himself known to a number of people in the town. Mrs. Sappleton is the recipient of such a letter, and it is this that brings Nuttel to her home.

Mr. Framton Nuttel

Mr. Framton Nuttel suffers from an undisclosed nervous ailment and comes to the country in hope that its atmosphere will be conducive to a cure. He brings a letter of introduction to Mrs. Sappleton in order to make her acquaintance for his stay in her village. While he waits for Mrs. Sappleton to appear, her niece keeps him company and tells him a story about why a window in the room has been left open. He believes her story, that the window remains open in hopes that Mrs. Sappleton’s husband and brother, who the niece says are long dead, will one day return. Later, when Nuttel looks out the window and sees figures approaching who match the descriptions of the long-dead hunters in the niece’s story, he suffers a mental breakdown and flees the house.

Ronnie

Ronnie is Mrs. Sappleton’s younger brother, who, with Mr. Sappleton, has been away on a hunting expedition.

Mr. Sappleton

Mr. Sappleton is Mrs. Sappleton’s husband. He has been away during most of the story on a hunting expedition with Mrs. Sappleton’s younger brother, Ronnie.

Mrs. Sappleton

Readers are first led to believe that Mrs. Sappleton is a widow, keeping vigil for her departed husband and brother, who have disappeared during a hunting trip. She lives with her young niece.

Vera

Vera is the niece of Mrs. Sappleton, the woman to whom Framton Nuttel plans to give a letter of introduction. She is a teller of tales, a young woman whose forte is “romance at short notice.” She is an exquisite and intuitive actress, equally skilled at deceit and its concealment. While Nuttel waits with her for Mrs. Sappleton to appear, Vera relates an elaborate story surrounding a window in the room that has been left open. It is this story, of the death of some relatives who went hunting long ago, that eventually causes Framton Nuttel’s breakdown. She tells Nuttel that the window is left open as a sign of her aunt’s hope that the dead hunters will one day come home and provides a detailed description of the men, their behavior and attire. After Nuttel flees upon seeing these men return, just as Vera has described them, Vera invents a story explaining his departure as well. Saki refers to Vera as “self-possessed,” which literally means that she has self-control and poise. In the context of this story, it is clear that this is the quality that allows her to lie so well — Vera’s self-possession allows her to maintain a cool head and calm believability while relating that most outlandish of tales.


Style

“The Open Window” is the story of a deception, perpetrated on an unsuspecting, and constitutionally nervous man, by a young lady whose motivations for lying remain unclear.

Structure

The most remarkable of Saki’s devices in “The Open Window” is his construction of the story’s narrative. The structure of the story is actually that of a story-within-a-story. The larger “frame” narrative is that of Mr. Nuttel’s arrival at Mrs. Sappleton’s house for the purpose of introducing himself to her. Within this narrative frame is the second story, that told by Mrs. Sappleton’s niece.

Symbolism

The most important symbol in “The Open Window” is the open window itself. When Mrs. Sappleton’s niece tells Mr. Nuttel the story of the lost hunters, the open window comes to symbolize Mrs. Sappleton’s anguish and heartbreak at the loss of her husband and younger brother. When the truth is later revealed, the open window no longer symbolizes anguish but the very deceit itself. Saki uses the symbol ironically by having the open window, an object one might expect would imply honesty, as a symbol of deceit.

Narration

“The Open Window” is a third-person narrative, meaning that its action is presented by a narrator who is not himself involved in the story. This allows a narrator to portray events from a variety of points of view, conveying what all of the characters are doing and what they are feeling or thinking. For most of the story, until he runs from the house, the reader shares Mr. Nuttel’s point of view. Like Mr. Nuttel, the reader is at the mercy of

Vera’s story. The reader remains, however, after Mr. Nuttel has fled and thus learns that Vera’s story was nothing but a tall tale.

Tall Tale

Vera’s story is essentially a tall tale. Tall tales are often found in folklore and legend and describe people or events in an exaggerated manner. Good examples are the story of John Henry and his hammer, and the story of Paul Bunyan and Babe the Blue Ox. Vera exaggerates the significance of the open window by making it the centerpiece of a fabricated tale of tragic loss.

Media Adaptations

  • Richard Patterson directed a film adaptation of “The Open Window” in 1971. Produced by the American Film Institute, it is a 12-minute short.
  • In 1980, The Open Window/Child’s Play offered video interpretations of two of Saki’s short stories. It is 28 minutes long and available in VHS format from Monterey Home Video.
  • “The Open Window” was also adapted for video in 1990, available in VHS format from Pyramid Films & Video.

Topics for Further Study

  • What different things does the open window in the story symbolize to the characters? Give some other examples of symbols that mean different things to different people.
  • Has the country provided Mr. Nuttel with a respite from his nervous condition? What does this say about the nature of his nervous condition?
  • When and how do readers know that Mrs. Sappleton’s niece has been lying? Once it is revealed that she has been lying, can you find anything earlier in the story that, in retrospect, might seem like a clue to her deception?
  • Try to formulate a theory about why Mrs. Sappleton’s niece would behave in this way. Is she sinister? Bored? Both?

  • پنجره باز

    اچ اچ مونرو(ساكي)

     

    "عمه خانم به زودی خدمتتنون می رسند آقای ناتل " دختر پانزده ساله ای به خونسردی این را گفت و اضافه کرد " در این فاصله شما باید من رو تحمل کنید".

     فریمتون ناتل تلاش می کرد برای دختر حرفهایی بزند که نشان بدهد از سروقت نیامدن عمه ناراحت نیست. در واقع آقای ناتل بیشتر از هر موقعی شک کرده بود که آیا این مهمانی های تشریفاتی پشت سرهم با آدمهایی کاملا غریبه به درمان اعصاب او کمک خواهند کرد؟ اما به هر حال او به این مهمانی ها تن داده بود.

     " من می دونم که حالت بدتر می شه" خواهرش وقتی که آقای ناتل می خواست به ده مهاجرت کند تا کمی تنها باشد این را گفت و  ادامه داد" اگه تو بری اونجا و گوشه عزلت بگیری و با یه نفر آدم زنده حرف نزنی اعصابت بدتر از موقعی می شه که افسرده هستی . من می تونم بهت نامه معرفی بدم برای چند نفری که اونجا می شناسم. بعضی از اونها تا اونجایی که یادم می اد آدمهای خیلی خوبی بودند"

     فریمتون متعجب یود خانم سپلتون بانوی محترمی که یکی از نامه های معرفی برای او بود. چرا اینقدر دیر می آمد.

     برادرزاده خانم سپلتون وقتی سکوت بینشان را کافی دید گفت: " با مردم زیادی این دور بر آشنا شدید؟"

     فریمتون گفت: " به سختی با یک نفر ... خواهرم قبلا در خانه راهبه ها بود، حدود چهار سال پیش، بهم چند تا معرفی نامه برای چندنفری این دور و بر داده"

     جمله اخر را با پشیمانی واضحی بیان کرد.

     دختر جوان با خونسردی حرف او را دنبال کرد و گفت"  در واقع شما چیزی از عمه من نمی دونید؟"

     فریمتون حرفش را تایید کرد و گفت" فقط اسم و آدرس" . در واقع فریمتون داشت به این فکر می کرد که آیا خانم سپلتون ازدواج کرده یا بیوه است . اما عجیب این بود که خانه نشانه هایی از سکونت مردانه داشت.

     " غم بزرگ عمه حدود سه سال پیش اتفاق افتاد " دختر ادامه داد " این قبل از این بود که خواهر شما به اینجا بیاد"

     " غم بزرگ؟ " فریمتون طوری این را گفت که انگار در این ده پرآسایش هیچ غمی نباید وجود داشته باشد.

     دختر همانطور که به پنجره بزرگ فرانسوی که به علفزار باز شده بود اشاره می کرد گفت" حتما تعجب می کنید که چرا ما پنجره رو توی این بعد از ظهر اکتبر باز گذاشتیم؟"

     

     فریمتون گفت" خب برای این موقع سال که پاییزه هوا یه کم گرمه ... اما خب این پنجره چه ربطی به غم بزرگ عمه شما داره؟"

    " سه سال پیش، یه روزی بیرون این پنجره، شوهرش و دو تا برادر جوونش  برای شکار بیرون رفتند. اونا هیچ وقت برنگشتند . تو راه رفتن به شکارگاه، همه آنها به یک باتلاق بزرگ و وحشتناک فرو رفتند. زمین جایی که اصلا کسی فکرشو نمی کرد تو تابستون باتلاق داشته باشه، از یه جای مطمئن به یه جای خطرناک تبدیل شد. جسدشون هیچ وقت پیدا نشد. بدترین و وحشتناکترین قسمتش همین بود" صدای دخترجوان به لکنت افتاده بود " عمه بیچاره فکر می کنه یه روزی اونا برمی گردند. اونا و سگ قهوه ای کوچیکشون که اونم گم شد. فکر می کنه اونا برمی گردند و اون می تونه اونها رو از همین پنجره ببینه . به خاطر همینه که پنجره رو هر بعد اظهر باز می گذاره تا غروب بشه. عمه بیچاره عزیزم، اغلب در مورد اینکه اونها چطور رفتند و اینکه شوهرش بارانی سفیدش رو توی دتستش نگه داشته بود و رونی برادر جوونترش آواز می خونده و دستش می انداخته که " هی برتی چرا بالا و پایین می پری " تا اون رو عصبانی کنه. می دونید چیه؟ من گاهی اوقات تو بعداظهرهایی مثل الان . یه حس غریبی دارم که همه اونها دارن از میان پنجره دیده می شن"

     دختر حرفش را با لرزش کوتاهی نیمه تمام گذاشت. فریمتون وقتی عمه خانم با رگبار معذرت می خوام معذرت می خوام وارد اتاق شد. احساس آسودگی کرد.

    او گفت:" امیدوارم ورا سرگرمتون کرده باشه؟"

    فریمتون جواب داد:" دختر جالبیه"

     ئدخانم سپلتون به تندی حرف می زد: امیدوارم پنجره باز اذییتنون نکرده باشه ... شوهرم و برادرانم از شکار برمی کردند و همیشه از این طرف می آیند.  برای شکار رفتند اطراف مرداب . وقتی که برگردند حتما فرشهای زیبای منو پر گل و کثیفی می کنند. مردها رو که می شناسید مگه نه؟

     او با خوشحالی در مورد شکار و کمبود پرندگان و اینکه اردکها در زمستان چند تا خواهند بود وراجی می کرد.  برای فریمتون همه اینها به طرز ناگواری ترسناک بود. او برای عوض کردن بحث به صحبتی که کمتر ناگوار باشد موفق شد تلاش ناامیدانه ای بکند. او توجه زن میزبانش را جلب کرد اما چشمان زن مدام روی پنجره و علفزار پشت آن نگاه می کرد و توجه کمی به فریمتون می کرد. و این مطمئنا برای فریمتون مایه تاسف بود زیرا او می بایست برای این دیدار پول می پرداخت و اینگونه پولش را دور می ریخت.

    "  دکترها به من دستور دادند که باید کاملا استراحت کنم ، بدور از هیجان، از همه چی باید پرهیز کنم حتی حرکات بدنی" فریمتون همینطور ادامه می داد با این پندار غلط که این آدمهای غربیه برای آشنا شدن با او می خواهند هر نکته ای را در مورد بیماری و ناتوانی او و یا علت و درمانش بدانند. فریمتون ادامه داد:" می دونید دکترها در مورد رژیم غذایی من زیاد توافق نداشتند"

     خانم سپلتون با صدای کسلی که بعد از یک خمیازه بود گفت :" تفاهم نداشتن؟"  بعد ناگهان انگار تمام حواسش جمع شد و هوشیار شد – اما نه به حرفهای فریمتون.

     او داد زد: " بلاخره رسیدند ... درست برای صرف چای ... اوه ببینشون تا سر پر گل شدند"

     فریمتون به آرامی برگشت و به ورا نگاه همدردانه ای کرد. دختر با چشمانی پر از وحشت به پنجره باز زل زده بود. فریمتون ناامیدانه و با ترسی غریب در صندلی اش برگشت و به مسیر نگاه آن دو خیره شد.

     در میان تاریک روشن غروب سه شخص دیده می شدند که از طرف مرغزار به سمت پنجره می آمدند.  همه آنها اسلحه حمل می کردند و یکی از انها بارانی سفید پوشیده بود. سگ قهوه ای رنگ همه با خستگی کنار پای مردها راه می آمد. آنها بی صدا به خانه نزدیک شدند تا اینکه صدای جوانی  با آهنگ صدا زد" برتی بت می گم برا چی بالا و پایین می پری"

     فریمتون به تندی به عصا و کلاهش چنگ زد از میان هال و از در خانه و سنگفرش جلوی خانه به سرعت گذشت. او طوری سریع می رفت که نزدیک بود به یک دوچرخه سوار برخورد کند.

     مردی که که اسلحه مکینتاش حمل می کرد از میان پنجره گفت: " عزیزم، ما رسیدیم ... کمی گلی شدیم ولی بیشترش دیگه خشک شده. اون مردی که مثل تیر از خونه زد بیرون کی بود؟"

    خانم سپلتون جواب داد:" یه مرد عجیب غریبی به اسم آقای ناتل! که فقط بلد بود در مورد بیماریش حرف بزنه و بدون معذرت خواهی یا خداحافظ گذاشت رفت. انگار که روح دیده باشه."

    ورا با خونسردی گفت: " فکر کنم به خاطر سگمون بود ... او برا من تعریف کرد یه زمانی تو هند بوده و توی یه قبرستون یه ده یه گله سگ وحشی بهش حمله می کنند. اون مجبور می شه بره توی یه قبری که تازه گنده شده بود و شب رو اون تو سر کنه درحالی که اون سگهای وحشی بالاسرش پارس می کردند و زوزه می کشیدن  و دندنهای تیزشون رو بهش نشون می دادند. این برای دیوونه شدن آدم کافیه."

     استعداد ورا قصه سرهم کردن بود.


  • عمه خانم به زودی خدمتتنون می رسند آقای ناتل " دختر پانزده ساله ای به خونسردی این را گفت و اضافه کرد " در این فاصله شما باید من رو تحمل کنید".

     فریمتون ناتل تلاش می کرد برای دختر حرفهایی بزند که نشان بدهد از سروقت نیامدن عمه ناراحت نیست. در واقع آقای ناتل بیشتر از هر موقعی شک کرده بود که آیا این مهمانی های تشریفاتی پشت سرهم با آدمهایی کاملا غریبه به درمان اعصاب او کمک خواهند کرد؟ اما به هر حال او به این مهمانی ها تن داده بود.

     " من می دونم که حالت بدتر می شه" خواهرش وقتی که آقای ناتل می خواست به ده مهاجرت کند تا کمی تنها باشد این را گفت و  ادامه داد" اگه تو بری اونجا و گوشه عزلت بگیری و با یه نفر آدم زنده حرف نزنی اعصابت بدتر از موقعی می شه که افسرده هستی . من می تونم بهت نامه معرفی بدم برای چند نفری که اونجا می شناسم. بعضی از اونها تا اونجایی که یادم می اد آدمهای خیلی خوبی بودند"

     فریمتون متعجب یود خانم سپلتون بانوی محترمی که یکی از نامه های معرفی برای او بود. چرا اینقدر دیر می آمد.

     برادرزاده خانم سپلتون وقتی سکوت بینشان را کافی دید گفت: " با مردم زیادی این دور بر آشنا شدید؟"

     فریمتون گفت: " به سختی با یک نفر ... خواهرم قبلا در خانه راهبه ها بود، حدود چهار سال پیش، بهم چند تا معرفی نامه برای چندنفری این دور و بر داده"

     جمله اخر را با پشیمانی واضحی بیان کرد.

     دختر جوان با خونسردی حرف او را دنبال کرد و گفت"  در واقع شما چیزی از عمه من نمی دونید؟"

     فریمتون حرفش را تایید کرد و گفت" فقط اسم و آدرس" . در واقع فریمتون داشت به این فکر می کرد که آیا خانم سپلتون ازدواج کرده یا بیوه است . اما عجیب این بود که خانه نشانه هایی از سکونت مردانه داشت.

     " غم بزرگ عمه حدود سه سال پیش اتفاق افتاد " دختر ادامه داد " این قبل از این بود که خواهر شما به اینجا بیاد"

     " غم بزرگ؟ " فریمتون طوری این را گفت که انگار در این ده پرآسایش هیچ غمی نباید وجود داشته باشد.

     دختر همانطور که به پنجره بزرگ فرانسوی که به علفزار باز شده بود اشاره می کرد گفت" حتما تعجب می کنید که چرا ما پنجره رو توی این بعد از ظهر اکتبر باز گذاشتیم؟"

     فریمتون گفت" خب برای این موقع سال که پاییزه هوا یه کم گرمه ... اما خب این پنجره چه ربطی به غم بزرگ عمه شما داره؟"

    " سه سال پیش، یه روزی بیرون این پنجره، شوهرش و دو تا برادر جوونش  برای شکار بیرون رفتند. اونا هیچ وقت برنگشتند . تو راه رفتن به شکارگاه، همه آنها به یک باتلاق بزرگ و وحشتناک فرو رفتند. زمین جایی که اصلا کسی فکرشو نمی کرد تو تابستون باتلاق داشته باشه، از یه جای مطمئن به یه جای خطرناک تبدیل شد. جسدشون هیچ وقت پیدا نشد. بدترین و وحشتناکترین قسمتش همین بود" صدای دخترجوان به لکنت افتاده بود " عمه بیچاره فکر می کنه یه روزی اونا برمی گردند. اونا و سگ قهوه ای کوچیکشون که اونم گم شد. فکر می کنه اونا برمی گردند و اون می تونه اونها رو از همین پنجره ببینه . به خاطر همینه که پنجره رو هر بعد اظهر باز می گذاره تا غروب بشه. عمه بیچاره عزیزم، اغلب در مورد اینکه اونها چطور رفتند و اینکه شوهرش بارانی سفیدش رو توی دتستش نگه داشته بود و رونی برادر جوونترش آواز می خونده و دستش می انداخته که " هی برتی چرا بالا و پایین می پری " تا اون رو عصبانی کنه. می دونید چیه؟ من گاهی اوقات تو بعداظهرهایی مثل الان . یه حس غریبی دارم که همه اونها دارن از میان پنجره دیده می شن"

     دختر حرفش را با لرزش کوتاهی نیمه تمام گذاشت. فریمتون وقتی عمه خانم با رگبار معذرت می خوام معذرت می خوام وارد اتاق شد. احساس آسودگی کرد.

    او گفت:" امیدوارم ورا سرگرمتون کرده باشه؟"

    فریمتون جواب داد:" دختر جالبیه"

     ئدخانم سپلتون به تندی حرف می زد: امیدوارم پنجره باز اذییتنون نکرده باشه ... شوهرم و برادرانم از شکار برمی کردند و همیشه از این طرف می آیند.  برای شکار رفتند اطراف مرداب . وقتی که برگردند حتما فرشهای زیبای منو پر گل و کثیفی می کنند. مردها رو که می شناسید مگه نه؟

     او با خوشحالی در مورد شکار و کمبود پرندگان و اینکه اردکها در زمستان چند تا خواهند بود وراجی می کرد.  برای فریمتون همه اینها به طرز ناگواری ترسناک بود. او برای عوض کردن بحث به صحبتی که کمتر ناگوار باشد موفق شد تلاش ناامیدانه ای بکند. او توجه زن میزبانش را جلب کرد اما چشمان زن مدام روی پنجره و علفزار پشت آن نگاه می کرد و توجه کمی به فریمتون می کرد. و این مطمئنا برای فریمتون مایه تاسف بود زیرا او می بایست برای این دیدار پول می پرداخت و اینگونه پولش را دور می ریخت.

    "  دکترها به من دستور دادند که باید کاملا استراحت کنم ، بدور از هیجان، از همه چی باید پرهیز کنم حتی حرکات بدنی" فریمتون همینطور ادامه می داد با این پندار غلط که این آدمهای غربیه برای آشنا شدن با او می خواهند هر نکته ای را در مورد بیماری و ناتوانی او و یا علت و درمانش بدانند. فریمتون ادامه داد:" می دونید دکترها در مورد رژیم غذایی من زیاد توافق نداشتند"

     خانم سپلتون با صدای کسلی که بعد از یک خمیازه بود گفت :" تفاهم نداشتن؟"  بعد ناگهان انگار تمام حواسش جمع شد و هوشیار شد – اما نه به حرفهای فریمتون.

     او داد زد: " بلاخره رسیدند ... درست برای صرف چای ... اوه ببینشون تا سر پر گل شدند"

     فریمتون به آرامی برگشت و به ورا نگاه همدردانه ای کرد. دختر با چشمانی پر از وحشت به پنجره باز زل زده بود. فریمتون ناامیدانه و با ترسی غریب در صندلی اش برگشت و به مسیر نگاه آن دو خیره شد.

     در میان تاریک روشن غروب سه شخص دیده می شدند که از طرف مرغزار به سمت پنجره می آمدند.  همه آنها اسلحه حمل می کردند و یکی از انها بارانی سفید پوشیده بود. سگ قهوه ای رنگ همه با خستگی کنار پای مردها راه می آمد. آنها بی صدا به خانه نزدیک شدند تا اینکه صدای جوانی  با آهنگ صدا زد" برتی بت می گم برا چی بالا و پایین می پری"

     فریمتون به تندی به عصا و کلاهش چنگ زد از میان هال و از در خانه و سنگفرش جلوی خانه به سرعت گذشت. او طوری سریع می رفت که نزدیک بود به یک دوچرخه سوار برخورد کند.

     مردی که که اسلحه مکینتاش حمل می کرد از میان پنجره گفت: " عزیزم، ما رسیدیم ... کمی گلی شدیم ولی بیشترش دیگه خشک شده. اون مردی که مثل تیر از خونه زد بیرون کی بود؟"

    خانم سپلتون جواب داد:" یه مرد عجیب غریبی به اسم آقای ناتل! که فقط بلد بود در مورد بیماریش حرف بزنه و بدون معذرت خواهی یا خداحافظ گذاشت رفت. انگار که روح دیده باشه."

    ورا با خونسردی گفت: " فکر کنم به خاطر سگمون بود ... او برا من تعریف کرد یه زمانی تو هند بوده و توی یه قبرستون یه ده یه گله سگ وحشی بهش حمله می کنند. اون مجبور می شه بره توی یه قبری که تازه گنده شده بود و شب رو اون تو سر کنه درحالی که اون سگهای وحشی بالاسرش پارس می کردند و زوزه می کشیدن  و دندنهای تیزشون رو بهش نشون می دادند. این برای دیوونه شدن آدم کافیه."

     استعداد ورا قصه سرهم کردن بود.


  • دختر با صدایی کاملا مطمئن گفت: "آقای ناتل! چند دقیقه دیگر عمه‌ام می‌آید پایین و در این فاصله شما باید منتظر بمانید."
    «فرامتون ناتل» سعی کرد چیز مناسبی بگوید که خواهرزاده خوشحال بشود. در حالی که توی دلش درباره‌ی این دیدارهای رسمی پشت سر هم با آدم‌هایی که اصلا آنها را نمی‌شناخت تردید پیدا کرده بود. این دیدارها در زمان استراحت او چه فایده‌ای می‌توانست داشته باشد؟
    وقتی داشت برای سفر به این منطقه ییلاقی آماده می‌شد، خواهرش گفت: "تو تنهایی خودت را آنجا دفن می‌کنی، هیچ کس را نخواهی داشت که با او حرف بزنی و وقتی احساس تنهایی کنی معلوم است که وضع اعصابت بهتر نمی‌شود. من چند نامه به تو می‌دهم و به همه‌ی آنهایی که در آن منطقه می‌شناسم سفارش تو را می‌کنم. بعضی از آنها واقعا مردمان خوبی هستند. "

    فرامتون با خودش فکر کرد، خانم سابلتون که چند دقیقه دیگر یکی از نامه‌ها را به او می‌دهد، از همین دسته‌ی آخر است که خواهرش می‌گفت؟
    دختر جوان گفت: "آدم‌های زیادی را اینجا می‌شناسی؟ "
    _ تقریبا هیچ کس را نمی‌شناسم. خواهرم چهار سال پیش توی خانه‌ی کشیش این منطقه اقامت داشت. حالا چند نامه برای بعضی از آشناهاش به من داده.
    _ پس چیزی درباره‌ی عمه‌ام نمی‌دانی؟
    _ هیچ چیز به جز نام و نشانی.
    دختر جوان آهی کشید و گفت: "مصیبت بزرگش درست از سه سال پیش شروع شد. فکر می‌کنم کمی بعد از اینکه خواهرت از اینجا رفت."
    فرامتون پرسید: مصیبت؟
    انگار مصیبت در این منطقه‌ی آرام ییلاقی بی‌معنا بود. دختر به پنجره‌ی بزرگی که مثل یک در، رو به باغ باز می‌شد، اشاره کرد و گفت: "لابد از خودت پرسیده‌ای که چرا در این وقت غروب، در ماه اکتبر هر دو لنگه‌ی این پنجره را باز گذاشته‌اید؟"
    فرامتون گفت: "هوا توی این وقت سال خیلی گرم است. ولی چه رابطه‌ای بین مصیبت و پنجره هست؟"

    ــ از خود همین پنجره، همسر و دو برادر جوان عمه برای شکار رفتند و دیگر بر نگشتند. وقتی آنها از زمین‌های بایر عبور می‌کردند تا به محل شکار مرغ‌های جنگلی برسند، همه توی باتلاق رفتند و باتلاق آنها را بلعید. این اتفاق همانطور که می‌دانی آن تابستانی رخ داد که همه‌جا رطوبت وحشتناکی داشت. طوری که همه‌ی جاهایی که وقت‌های دیگر امن بودند، زیر پاهای آدم فرو می‌رفتند. جسدشان هیچ وقت پیدا نشد و این وحشناک‌ترین قسمت ماجرا بود.

    اینجا صدای دختر جوان اطمینان و محکمی خود را از دست داد و انگار شکسته شد. "عمه‌ی بیچاره‌ام فکر می‌کند که آنها یکی از همین روزها بر می‌گردند و سگ کوچولوی سیاهشان را هم که با آنها گم شده، طبق عادت از این پنجره وارد خواهد شد. برای همین است که این پنجره را تا شب باز نگه می‌دارد. بیچاره عمه‌ی عزیزم... بارها برایم تعریف کرده که چطور رفتند... همسرش یک بارانی روی دوشش انداخته بود و برادر کوچکش طبق معمول می‌گفت: برتی! چرا می‌پری؟... آره، وقتی یک روز غروب مثل امروز اینقدر آرام است، یک احساس مبهم به من هم دست می‌دهد که آنها همگی از این پنجره باز خواهند گشت. "

    و ناگهان ساکت شد، انگار یک دفعه لرزید و فرامتون احساس راحتی کرد. وقتی که عمه به سالن آمد و در حالی که به‌خاطر دیر آمدن عذر خواهی می‌کرد، گفت: "فکر می‌کنم «ویرا» سختی انتظار را برایتان آسان کرده باشد؟"
    فرامتون جواب داد: "او آدم را سرگشته می‌کند. "
    خانم فرامتون گفت: "امیدورام باز بودن پنجره اذیتتان نکند. نزدیک است که همسر و دو برادرم از شکار برگردند. آن‌ها همیشه از این پنجره می آیند. امروز برای شکار به مرداب رفته‌اند و فرش‌های بیچاره‌مان کثیف خواهند شد. وای از دست مردها!"
    عمه همه‌اش از شکار حرف می‌زد و از وسایل شکار مرغابی در زمستان. فرامتون سعی می‌کرد موضوع صحبت را عوض کند اما بی فایده بود. احساس می‌کرد میزبانش خیلی به او اهمیت نمی‌دهد و نگاهش همیشه به طرف پنجره می‌رود و به مزرعه‌ای که پشت آن پیداست.
    فرامتون گفت: "پزشک‌ها استراحت کامل برایم تجویز کرده‌اند و سفارش کرده‌اند که از کوچکترین هیجان و تمرین‌های سخت ورزشی پرهیز کنم. "
    این را گفت و به خیال فرو رفت. خانم سابلتون در یک وقت مناسب، طوری که خمیازه‌ی او را بپوشاند با صدای بلندی گفت: " آه؟!" همان وقت چهره‌اش درخشید و ناگهان داد زد: "ایناها! آن‌ها درست وقت چای رسیدند. گِل سرتاپایشان را پوشانده."

    فرامتون کمی لرزید و نگاهی از سر مهربانی به دختر جوان انداخت و دید که دختر هم به پنجره‌ی باز چشم دوخته. ترس در جان فرامتون افتاد، 180 درجه روی صندلی چرخید و به همان طرف نگاه کرد. توی تاریکی اول شب، سه نفر داشتند از مزرعه به طرف پنجره می‌آمدند. فرامتون آنچه را که می‌دید، باور نمی‌کرد. یکی از آنها یک تفنگ دستش بود.
    بی‌هیچ حرکت اضافی داشتند به طرف خانه می‌آمدند و ناگهان صدای یک مرد جوان بلند شد: "برتی! چرا می پری؟"

    فرامتون ناگهان از جا پرید و عصا و کلاهش را برداشت و به سرعت از سالن به طرف راهروی خروجی رفت. زود به نرده‌های بیرون رسید و توی کوچه پرید و دوچرخه‌سواری را که با خیال راحت داشت می‌آمد، مجبور کرد تا خودش را به نرده‌ها بزند تا به او برخورد نکند!
    مردی که تفنگ دستش بود وقتی از پنجره پرید، گفت: "ما آمدیم! ما کثیفیم. ولی گِل‌ها خشک شده است. راستی این مرد کی بود که وقتی ما نزدیک شدیم، در رفت؟"
    خانم سابلتون گفت: "اسمش، آقای سابل است... هیچ چیز هم نمی‌داند غیر از اینکه درباره‌ی بیماریش حرف بزند. وقتی هم که شما آمدید، بی‌خداحافظی و عذرخواهی به طرف در رفت، انگار شبح دیده باشد. "

    دختر جوان آرام گفت: "فکر می‌کنم علتش وجود سگ باشد. او برایم گفت که از سگ‌ها می‌ترسد. یک روز در یک گورستان سگ‌ها او را دنبال می‌کنند و او مجبور می‌شود که یک شب در قبری که تازه کنده شده، به سر ببرد. در حالی که سگ‌ها بالای سرش از کوره در رفته و پارس می‌کردند. اینها برای به هم ریختن اعصاب او کافی‌ست."

    در واقع داستان‌سرایی تخصص این دختر بیچاره بود



تاريخ : شنبه بیست و سوم مهر 1390 | 5:12 بعد از ظهر | نویسنده : ر |
  • بوم اف
  • بک لینک